Author Topic: The french fry  (Read 9777 times)

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Offline Randy

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The french fry
« on: May 28, 2004, 04:03:31 PM »
Let the word go out that I am in search of the perfect french fry.
For those of you old enough to remember McDonalds french fries when they were cut from raw potatoes at every store that is the height of the bar.
 8)
Randy




Offline Randy

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Re: The french fry
« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2004, 04:09:57 PM »
Here is the first finding.
Curing potatoes for exactly three weeks prior to frying them became standard practice for Mcdonalds , allowing for enough of the spuds sugars to be converted into starches. Without this waiting period, the sugars in the potato make the fry turn brown too quickly.
I also know they were fried twice like Belgian fries
Randy

Offline Steve

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Re: The french fry
« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2004, 09:47:55 PM »
The original McDonald's fries were fried in 100% beef tallow.

The best homemade fries are twice cooked.

Fry them for 5-8 minutes until limp and tender at about 325 degrees F. (do not let them brown). This cooks the potato but does not make it crisp. Let them cool to room temperature. Then, crank the fryer up to 375 degrees F. and fry until crisp, about 60 seconds. Do the second frying in small batches so that the oil does not cool down too quickly.

Do not salt the fries until you're ready to eat them.

Offline Randy

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Re: The french fry
« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2004, 07:43:36 AM »
Do you presoak your fries in water to help reduce the oil soaking in the fry?
Yes I was aware they were cooked in lard.  So were the best onion rings in the world at the Varsity in Atlanta until they switched to Conola.

Randy

Pierre

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Re: The french fry
« Reply #4 on: May 30, 2004, 04:09:43 PM »
there was a report in the paper here months ago. McDonald's claims their Fries are fried in 100% vegetable oil. They had to take that claim back because it was found that the oil used is flavoured with some broth (I believe it was Chicken). McDonalds still claims that anyway with a small footnote symbol.

I would suspect that in the USA they use the same type of oil.

Pierre

Offline Steve

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Re: The french fry
« Reply #5 on: May 30, 2004, 08:05:13 PM »
Soaking raw fries in water does nothing for the taste and texture... it merely buys you time from when you peel/cut the potatoes to when you fry them. If you plan to fry them immediately, then no soaking is required.

Pick up a copy of the book "The Man Who Ate Everything" by Jeffrey Steingarten. He has a very good chapter (and recipes) for making the best French fries. It's a "must read" if you're serious about making the best French fries.  8)




Offline Randy

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Re: The french fry
« Reply #6 on: May 30, 2004, 11:05:35 PM »
I will look for the book Steve, Pierre same thing went on here with Mcdonlds.

Randy

Offline Randy

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Re: The french fry
« Reply #7 on: June 01, 2004, 04:40:27 PM »
Tried this last night from a Bare foot Contesa show on Food TV and it was outstanding.
Get you some new red potatoes and boil them until a knife will  easily find the center.  Drain and let cool.  Quarter the potatoes and slice a few thin onion rings.  Fry them together in peanut oil until crisp on the outside.  Seems like that was 3 or 4 min.
May not do french fries again.

Randy

Offline DKM

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Re: The french fry
« Reply #8 on: July 07, 2004, 12:35:42 PM »
now that sounds like a good Q sidedish
Just how many boards can I be on anyways.

mcooknoe

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Re: The french fry
« Reply #9 on: June 27, 2005, 02:20:50 PM »
Randy,

reading through the post I saw you mentioned the Varsity in Atlanta. I grew up eating at the Varsity. My Grandmother lived in Atlanta and every time I went over to visit, the Varsity was on my must visit list. I would even buy extra burgers and fries to bring back home.....

Offline Randy

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Re: The french fry
« Reply #10 on: June 27, 2005, 02:33:21 PM »
An amazing place.  When we were children in the midfifties we would drive in to the Varsity and Dad would go slow until the curb boy jumped on the bumper and rode leaning on the fender to the spot where you parked then take your order.  They pride themselves in never writing the order down but you always had to watch them when they added it up in their head.  It was just part of the nuance.  Another classic hotdog place was the Yellow Jacket.

Offline 007bond-jb

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Re: The french fry
« Reply #11 on: July 05, 2005, 01:45:17 PM »
check this site outhttp://www.belgiamfries.com  (twice cooked fries damm good & easy)
« Last Edit: July 14, 2005, 07:31:42 AM by 007bond-jb »




Offline Lydia

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Re: The french fry
« Reply #12 on: June 04, 2006, 05:40:47 AM »
Hey Randy

I "was" a french fry addict, especially McD's fries from the 80's, (which was followed by a love of seasoned curly fries) so this is another one of my fortays. I have alot to share so bare with me.

Potato
Soaking
Blanching
Frying medium
Final frying
Salt

Potatoes
First off, I recommend Russets to achieve a McDonalds type french fry. I find red potatoes have too fine a texture and too sweet to mimic McD's fries from the 80's. They make a good Fry, just not a McD's.

The age of the potatoes plays a role in the final outcome of your fries. Older potatoes that have moisture loss will become a bit rubbery and eyes will most likely have started to develop. These are ideal for fries with a crisp exterior and a perfectly cooked middle. As a matter of fact these potatoes usually wont darken after being cut, not even a light pink, therefore eliminating the need to rinse them and will allow the starches to remain.

Soaking
I have mixed feelings about soaking the newer, firmer potatoes (russets). I usually have to, inorder to prevent darkening (I'm never allowed to make a small batch.) But when I consider what I had observed about older potatoes and moisture loss, soaking seems counter-intuitive. But when I do soak, I will add salt so that the potatoes will absorb some of the salt and enhance the flavor. I will also dry the potatoes thoroughly with a kitchen towel.

I have tried adding sugar and corn syrup to soaking water, the fries develop a deep caramel color, that I just don't recall McD's fries having. I remember a few fries being a bit darker at the ends but mainly being more of a golden color similar to the modern frys. But maybe my memory is failing me on this one. So you may want to give this method a try, I'll post the formula if you'd like it.

side note: Today's fry's are covered in something called invisi-coat, which I believe is somthing along the lines of baking powder or a baking powder-starch blend, but cannot confirm this, it's just a hunch.

My step-son finally got in, and it's really late, so I'll finish this later. Probly Monday.

This is an old thread, so Randy, if you have any updates, I'd be interested in hearing about them.

I appologize for the "to be continue thing" but it's very late and I really need to get into bed, now that I can.


Offline Lydia

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Re: The french fry
« Reply #13 on: June 04, 2006, 11:20:13 PM »
Blanching
Fries can be blanched by boiling, baking in the oven or in a lower temperature oil, just as steve mentioned.

Boiling
West Coast Fast-food chain, In-and Out Burger, uses this technique except the potatoes are cut into fries then boiled and strained with a colander. Which is obviously an exceptable alternative to the proceedure below. They must be frying at a lower temp. or more likely over-crowding the oil, because they do not get golden. They are stark white but are crispy, just the same.

Technique
* Put the potatoes in a large pan.
 *Cover with cold water. (putting potatoes into heated or already boiling water will cause them not to cook as     evenly - outside more tender than the inside)
 *Bring water to a boil over high heat.
 *As soon as the water starts to boil, turn the heat off but keep the pan on the burner.
 *Let the pan of potatoes stand on the burner for about 5 minutes, depending on the size of the potatoes.
 Larger potatoes may need more standing time.
 *You want a fork to easily piece the potato but meet some resistence. (If potatoes are cooked too long you wont be able to slice them and them and will overly saturated with oil when fried.)
 Drain all of the water from the pan.
 *Allow potatoes to cool enough to handle. This step also allows for water evaporation which is crucial for crisp fries.

I dont suggest this blanching technique if using older potatoes as I mentioned in the previous post.


Offline DKM

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Re: The french fry
« Reply #14 on: June 10, 2006, 02:51:52 PM »
I haven't made fries in ages.  I need to that when i'm on vacation!!

DKM
Just how many boards can I be on anyways.